Feeds
80%
Acer Aspire One 751

Acer Aspire One 751

Netbook with an 11.6in, HD screen

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Review The new Acer Aspire One 751 has a screen that measures 11.6in on the diagonal with a resolution of 1366 x 768 and that’s mighty big for a netbook. As it happens, we were told a few months back that Intel has strict rules about the sale of Atom N-series processors to avoid cannibalising the sales of Core 2 and Centrino products.

Acer Aspire One 751

Acer Aspire One 751: a netbook with a notebook screen resolution

One of those rules, we were told, is a ban on using the N270 or N280 in products with a screen size of more than ten inches. Clearly, the Aspire One 751 blows that line into the weeds so we have to accept that the screen size isn’t much use for defining whether a mobile device is a netbook or a notebook.

Happily, Acer has the answer down pat: a netbook is used to consume media from the net, it reckons, while a notebook can be used to create media. It’s a slick PR-produced answer that doesn’t really explain too much, so we’re choosing to understand that you can use a netbook to watch movies but you’ll need a proper notebook if you want to encode or recode movies.

The bottom surface of the Aspire One 751 is flat white and the lid is pearl white but once the lid is open you’re presented with a black keyboard and black screen surround. The keyboard is a decent size and the keys have a good amount of travel, although it flexes when you type hard. The layout of the keyboard has been done properly with the Enter key on the outside edge, and the Shift and Ctrl keys on both the right and the left side. The only quirk that we noted is that the Page Up and Page Down keys are next to each other instead of being one above the other.

The matte black surround to the touchpad is prone to showing greasy fingerprints and the touchpad itself is small - 65mm x 33mm - so your finger may slip off it occasionally. More annoyingly, the tapered strip that forms the two mouse buttons is tiny and less than 10mm deep at its thickest point which makes it tricky to use.

Acer Aspire One 751

Stylish looks

Although the touchpad looks conventional it is somewhat cleverer than you might expect as it incorporates multi-touch technology that allows you to zoom in and out of a page by pinching and spreading two fingers. Hmm, now where have we seen that idea before?

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Back to the ... drawing board: 'Hoverboard' will disappoint Marty McFly wannabes
Buzzing board (and some future apps) leave a lot to be desired
Chipmaker FTDI bricking counterfeit kit
USB-serial imitators whacked by driver update
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.