Feeds

Ocarina turns detective with extended online dedupe

New tune for NAS vendors

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Startup deduplication vendor Ocarina has extended its deduplication technology such that NAS vendors can use it to detect objects within and between files and compress them - something Ocarina says block-level deduplication can't do.

Ocarina has content-aware technology which can detect a JPEG or other digital media format and using specialised mathematical techniques reduce the object's file size without losing information. Traditionally the block-level deduplication or compression of such digitised images and videos was impossible unless the resolution was compromised and pixels lost.

It can be argued this is not technically deduplication, as repetitions in the file's byte sequence are not being detected and replaced by pointers, but the net effect of a reduced file size is the same.

Ocarina's v3.0 ECOsystem features what Ocarina calls "end-to-end, tunable storage optimisation, and extends content-aware dedupe and compression to hundreds of file types".

It says it "can identify duplicate information within and across file types, tiers and vendors, resulting in much higher reduction rates. Object dedupe delivers data reduction where ordinary block dedupe does not because it can operate without the need for a lot of duplicated data. Block dedupe is best suited for backup environments and object dedupe for online storage."

Ocarina's VP for products Carter George has blogged: "Since block dedupe has no awareness of content, it has no way to decide whether a given block should be deduped, compressed, or left alone. In a content-aware solution, you can say dedupe files like this, compress files like that, dedupe and compress files older than 'x', and leave these other kinds of files alone, because they are very performance sensitive."

The company has initiated an "Ocarina Optimized" partner program to embed its technology into clustered NAS offerings, claiming that doing this can deliver up to 90 percent storage capacity improvements and 3-5 times better results than NetApp's ASIS dedupe. This will help Ocarina-using NAS vendors, like BlueArc and Isilon, compete more strongly with deduplication market leader Data Domain. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
'Kim Kardashian snaps naked selfies with a BLACKBERRY'. *Twitterati gasps*
More alleged private, nude celeb pics appear online
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.