Feeds

New Kindle: Wider, but still no broadsheet

Embiggened reader might just have your eye out

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

Amazon has announced an enlarged Kindle e-book reader, aimed squarely at students and those whose reading extends beyond the latest bonkbuster to documents and textbooks.

Kindle_DX_001

Amazon's Kindle DX has a 9.7in display

Larger than the Kindle 2, the DX comes with a screen just shy of 25cm, (compared to the 15.2cm of the existing model), but still squeezes a QWERTY keyboard onto the bottom to allow annotation without having to provide a touchscreen. The resolution is 1200 x 824 with 16 shades of grey, and is priced at $489 (£323/€367).

It comes equipped with a connection to Amazon's Whispernet service - based on Sprint's CDMA network - thus limiting it to the US market, but enabling the newspaper and magazine subscriptions which were supposed to be the revenue generator for the service.

Not that Amazon is betting the future on subscriptions - it successfully sells books for the Kindle, and last week bought Lexcycle, publishers of the Stanza e-book reading software. Amazon also owns Mobipocket, the cross-platform e-book marketplace, but hasn't been putting a whole lot of effort into developing the Mobipocket clients - a shame, as the service is well integrated and works. But the Kindle DX is really about hardware, rather than extending the software platform.

Kindle_DX_002

Holds up to 3,500 books, periodicals and documents

In trying to replace all books the currently generation of e-book readers suffer from being a compromise between two distinctly different forms of reading. Fiction books need to be small, to read on the tube or in bed, and to thrown into a suitcase when travelling, while textbooks are more like reference documents that use space to lay out visual data - and need larger pages.

E-book readers have been trying to appeal to both markets, and failing to address either: your author has an iRex full of Ofcom documents which the screen can't quite display adequately, and a few books which don't get read as the device is too big to be comfortable on all but the longest flight. But achieving an economy of scale has always meant producing one device of intermediate size, failing to address either application particularly well.

Kindle_DX_003

Free wireless 60 second book delivery service

iRex has had some success getting its Iliad reader into government departments - these being experts in the production of huge documents - but the size of the device limits its application there in just the same way as its inability to fit into a handbag limits its application as an electronic book.

The DX could change that, especially if followed up with a much smaller device aimed squarely at those who need a Dan Brown nearby at all times; and by pushing the device into universities Amazon might even be able to achieve the scale of production needed to get the price sensible - if they get rid of that tacked-on keyboard, we might even buy one ourselves.

Check out the Amazon Kindle DX online. ®

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple ran off to IBM
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Nadella: Apps must run on ALL WINDOWS – PCs, slabs and mobes
Phone egg, meet desktop chicken - your mother
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations
Vows to uphold 'zero tolerance' policy on underage workers
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.