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HTC working on Android netbook?

Mole talks of HTC-developed, T-Mobile-branded Android PC

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HTC has emerged as the possible manufacturer of a T-Mobile Android netbook.

Talk of a T-Mobile Android netbook and/or tablet PC has been around for some time already. But a mole’s told blog TmoToday: “The HTC/T-Mobile team has been hard at work on an Android powered netbook.”

The source added that the T-Mobile netbook will feature “built in 3G connectivity” and be launched before the end of 2009.

HTC’s widely regarded as the primary source for Android-based mobile phones, with the firm already having partnered with T-Mobile for the launch of the world’s first Android mobile phone - the G1.

It also developed the world’s second Android phone: the Magic – released by Vodafone last week.

But the latest rumour, if accurate, could signify a production expansion for HTC that may even see it sell HTC-branded Android netbooks to compete with the likes of those thought to be under consideration at Acer. ®

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