Feeds

Hyperic acquisition binds Spring Framework to cloud

Visibility in uncertain times

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

SpringSource is moving into management of public and private clouds with its third acquisition in two years.

The commercial maintainer of the ever-popular Spring Framework has bought Hyperic, an open-source systems monitoring and management specialist. Hyperic specialized in bread-and-butter datacenter activities such as event notification, reporting, and analysis but began providing status updates for applications using Amazon Web Services and Google's App Engine.

Peter Cooper-Ellis, SpringSource's senior vice president of engineering and product management, called management of the cloud and virtualized datacenters a strategic driver for the deal. SpringSource will focus on management of cloud-based applications and also of virtualized server infrastructures in the next six to 12 months he told The Reg. In addition to cloud, Hyperic supports' Citrix Systems' XenServer.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. A roadmap is expected in the next 90 days.

The deal potentially helps those building open-source, Java, Apache, Groovy, or Grails systems interested in the on-going management and provisioning of those systems. Spring stewards the open-source Spring Framework, which is used to build its own open-source, modular Java application servers. The company's also added Apache, Groovy, and Grails technology to its stack - along with a number of customers - through the separate acquisitions of Covalent and G2One.

Public clouds, such as those provided by Amazon, have been notoriously opaque when it comes to letting you know what's going on and acting if there's a problem.

Cooper-Ellis said SpringSource's would cater to those using public and private clouds, as developers experimented in the public domain and then decided to run private data centers.

Javier Soltero - Hyperic chief executive and now Spring's chief technology officer of management products - said the deal combined what he called four "key elements" of the cloud: the Spring Framework, Apache's Tomcat, Groovy, and Grails.

While much of the focus will be on the technology roadmap, there's a hidden benefit here. Hyperic brings to SpringSource a number of big customers including Comcast and Intuit, that have turned to the company to manage web applications and systems. The G21 deal brought in social network LinkedIn and UK TV broadcasting giant BskyB while NASA, Intel, and British Telecom came over with the Covalent deal. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Whistling Google: PLEASE! Brussels can only hurt Europe, not us
And Commish is VERY pro-Google. Why should we worry?
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.