Feeds

Sacha Baron Cohen scars Paula Abdul for life

American Idol judge traumatised by Bruno interview

Build a business case: developing custom apps

American Idol judge Paula Abdul has described herself as "scarred for life" by a Sacha Baron Cohen set-up which saw her interviewed from the comfort of two Mexican gardeners by the Brit comedian's alter ego Bruno.

Abdul was last year duped into believing she was to be interviewed by a German TV crew "after winning an artist of the year award for her singing", the Telegraph explains. In fact, she was destined to be stitched up like a kipper by Cohen.

She told the Johnjay and Rich Show: "I walk in and I'm greeted by this futuristic Captain Nemo-looking dude with a mohawk, and he's flaming. I'm going, 'Oh, ok, this is going to be like one of those Japanese game shows'.

"There's no furniture except for a chair. This guy Bruno introduces himself and he goes, 'I'm sorry there's no furniture'. He yells, 'Gardeners!', snaps his fingers and these two Mexican guys come in, and they drop down on all fours. I see him paying them, like, 10 bucks. He goes, 'Sit there. Don't be nice to them - just sit'.

"And I'm so embarrassed and I'm holding my core muscles so as not to sit on them, and he pushes me down on them. "These two Mexican gardeners don't speak a word of English and I'm patting their backs and going, 'I'm so sorry'. It was really uncomfortable. And he kicks one of them and we all fall.

"I'm throwing daggers with my eyes at my publicist and saying, 'Get me out of here, this is crazy, this is not funny, this is discrimination and abusive stuff going on'. I just wanted out, this was too weird."

Bruno's request that Abdul throw herself at a Velcro wall finally proved too much for the poor girl, and she attempted to beat a retreat. She recounted: "I'm trying to hold a smile on my face and Bruno is running down the street in front of my car. It was hysterical but so disturbing."

Remarkably, Abdul didn't realise she'd been had until three weeks ago, when a magazine called to ask about her cameo role in the movie. She said: "At two o'clock in the morning that night I woke up in a cold sweat, popped my body up out of bed and went, 'Oh my God.'"

Abdul concluded that the publicist who'd signed the release form for the improvised Mexican bench interview "no longer works for me". ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
Cops baffled by riddle of CHICKEN who crossed ROAD
'Officers were unable to determine Chicken's intent'
MEN WANTED to satisfy town full of yearning BRAZILIAN HOTNESS
'Prettier, better organised, more harmonious than if men were in charge'
Drunkards warned: If you can't walk in a straight line, don't shop online, you fool!
Put it away boys. Cover them up ladies. Your credit cards, we mean
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
Murder accused DIDN'T ask Siri 'how to hide my roommate'
US court hears of cached browser image - not actual request
Chomp that sausage: Brits just LOVE scoffing a Full Monty
Sales of traditional brekkie foods soar as hungry folk get their mitts greasy
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?