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Isle of Man KKK burns cross on Facebook

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Facebook has closed an "Isle of Man KKK" page exhorting locals to stem the tide of unwelcome incomers polluting the racial purity of the Irish Sea island paradise.

According to the Telegraph, the page's Grand Wizard declared: "There are too many comovers* [sic] on the Island. They are taking all of the jobs, houses and most of all they are taking advantage of our fucking Island. .... join us and help clense [sic] the Isle of Man."

The campaign quickly attracted the attention of kids from the island's secondary schools, with pupils from all six - including the private King William's College - joining the group. One thundered: "Damn blacks and indians [sic], coming over here taking our jobs - who the fuck do they think they are?"

Staff at Ballakermeen High School subsequently alerted Facebook. Deputy head Paul Kane said the school had "talked to each student listed as a member of the group", but declined to say if further action against them was on the cards.

In fact, Kane said the pupils implicated in the outrage had actually signed up to have a pop at the group, and that the young 'un responsible for the "damn blacks and indians" jibe was mixed race and "trying to be ironic rather than serious".

He elaborated: "There are one or two ambiguous remarks from our students, but we think these were intended as sarcasm. I'm pleased that the vast majority disagree with the sentiments of this group and want nothing to do with it.

"We are very strongly against any racist attitudes in this school and people are left in no doubt about that."

A spokesman for the Manx Department of Education said: "The department finds the sentiment behind this site deplorable and cannot condone racist comments and viewpoints."

The Department of Education's opinion on the deplorable state of its pupils' spelling is not noted. ®

Bootnote

* ="comeover", an immigrant, in local parlance.

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