Feeds

Videogame history project successfully emulates CRT on LCD

See old games how they were meant to look

Business security measures using SSL

We thought fuzzy images went out with cathode ray tube monitors, but a team of boffins at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed an app that mimics the visual characteristics of CRTs on today crisp, pixel-perfect LCD screens.

And it's all been done in the interest of historical research, specifically the evolution of videogames.

According to GIT Associate Professor Ian Bogost, emulation software is all very well at allowing modern historians to examine old videogames, but they don't give you the true feel of playing an arcade game or 8-bit computer programme, all of which were orginally displayed on CRTs, either monitors or TVs.

More to the point, many of them were written to take advantage of the quirks of CRT display technology.

To change that, GIT coders Edward Booth, Michael Cook, Justin Dobbs, Will Rowland and Prince Yang took the open souces Atari VCS 2600 emulator Stella and tweaked the graphics routines to emulate phosphor glow, colour bleed and the noise associated with hooking a CRT up to a source through an radio-frequency modulator.

Georgia Institute of Technology CRT emulation

Georgia Institute of Technology's CRT emulation in action
Click for full-size image

Pics posted by Bogost on the GIT website show how well the team managed to recreate the look of CRT on LCD, but he said you really appreciate the difference when you play the games.

Oldsters will be able to relive youths misspent in arcade halls, while younger players will get to game the way their dads did. Researchers into videogame history will be able to see games how they would have appeared when released.

Bogost said the five coders were working with the Stella development team to get their modifications incorporated into the emulator's official release. You can download Stella here.

We're anticipating the code being incorporated into a future Blu-ray Disc playback app to allow the latest HD movies to be viewed in VHS-o-Vision. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Half a BILLION in the making: Bungie's Destiny reviewed
It feels very familiar - but it's still good
Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT
Let's >sigh< see what Cupertino has been up to for the past year
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
A SCORCHIO fatboy SSD: Samsung SSD850 PRO 3D V-NAND
4Gb/s speeds on a consumer drive, anyone?
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Get your Indian Landfill Android One handsets - they're only SIXTY QUID
Cheap and deafening mobes for the subcontinental masses
Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch
Sizes, prices and all – but not for the wrist-o-puter
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.