Feeds

Will CA's stringent roadmap come back to haunt it?

Nuts in May

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Management software firm CA is superstitious and refuses to release a product with the number 13 attached to it.

The result? The next version of the vendor’s ARCserve Backup product will skip straight from 12.5 to 14 to avoid, it hopes, any bad luck along the way.

CA has laid out an ambitious roadmap for its backup products. The company plans to release software annually each May for resellers to punt to their customers.

Interestingly, and perhaps somewhat naively, CA is convinced it has got its method right on hitting such a high turnover of deadlines with its ARCserve product.

Unlike an increasingly shy Microsoft, which these days tries to keep software release dates close to its chest, CA is happy to pin down every May as the month when the next version of its products will land.

So what happens if CA hits any bugs or other problems while developing its product? Will it release incomplete software into the channel?

“Once a year we will release our software on time, on schedule,” insisted senior veep Adam Famularo, who was speaking at CA’s Q1 2009 EMEA Partner Summit in Barcelona.

“The idea there is that customers will see more value in our software, they buy maintenance and get upgrades for free. From a reseller's standpoint they can sell the software to customers one day and they know they can go back the following year to renew the maintenance, and on top of that provide additional services for training them on the newest release,” he said.

Famularo thinks that such a strategy is a Dell Boy-like “win-win for everybody”.

He told The Register that it's more important for CA to keep its promise of delivering a product every May. He also insisted the company would not slip up on bringing out ARCserve 14 in May 2010.

"I’m gonna deliver a product every May, on time, and I’m sticking to that," he said. "We’ve left padding in to help us out with those small bumps."

It's an ambitious declaration for CA's developer team, which is in fact given a target of readying products by April, to allow a small buffer before the deadline.

But in the real world, sticking to such a stringent annual deadline might come back to haunt CA in the future if it fails to deliver the goods to the channel. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft refuses to nip 'Windows 9' unzip lip slip
Look at the shiny Windows 8.1, why can't you people talk about 8.1, sobs an exec somewhere
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable
Floats exam program to help IT employers lock up talent
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?