Feeds

Big Blue, Brocade to show united front to Cisco

IBM to OEM Brocade's Ethernet gear

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

IBM is about to supply Brocade's Foundry-based networking products, according to persistent rumours reported by Reuters and others.

Neither company has commented on this matter, although Brocade has said that it expects to benefit through closer ties with server partners, following Cisco's entry into the server market.

IBM is said to be distancing itself from Cisco, following Cisco's entry into the blade server and unified data centre server system market with its UCS product. This combines server, server virtualisation software, and networking in one product, with certified storage products virtually giving a one-stop buy for what has been called a re-invented mainframe. This product is intended to access shared storage by Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) protocol rather than today's physical Fibre Channel fabric.

IBM has a mainframe market it dominates and is also a leading supplier of blade server systems. It cannot be best pleased that a supplier it uses for networking products has entered a core IBM hardware market. If data centre customers are going to buy unified blade server + Ethernet networking + storage + server virtualisation systems then IBM needs to be able to supply them. IBM has the blade server and basic storage components. Like every other supplier it will OEM VMware and Microsoft's Hyper-V plus a Linux hypervisor, but it lacks Ethernet switches to fit in such systems.

IBM has strengthened an existing deal with Blade Network Technologies with the two companies cross-licensing each other's patents. This doesn't give IBM FCoE technology though.

IBM already supplies Brocade Fibre Channel storage area network (SAN) fabric switches and thus an extension to Brocade Ethernet products, which Brocade gained with its Foundry acquisition, would be fairly simple. Brocade is an FCoE supporter - it has announced a top-of-rack FCoE switch - and, once IBM's storage products have a native FCoE interface, an end-to-end FCoE connection could link blade servers and storage boxes through these Brocade switches.

IBM resells NetApp storage products as its N series and NetApp has already demonstrated a native FCoE interface on one of its products.

The speculation is that IBM will resell Brocade's FCoE-capable Ethernet switches and routers, with an announcement expected in the next few weeks.

Access to FCoE technology is becoming a key requirement for companies supplying unified data centre systems, and is thought to be a driver in Broadcom's attempted acquisition of Emulex. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Cutting cancer rates: Data, models and a happy ending?
How surgery might be making cancer prognoses worse
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?