Feeds

Virt tool maker Cassatt is going titsup

Tough times of the B in BEA

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

William Coleman - the founder and chief executive officer at server virtualization management tool maker Cassatt - has bared his soul to Forbes magazine and says that the company is in the process of trying to sell itself or shutting down and selling off its assets.

A company spokesperson confirmed the Forbes report and added that Cassatt currently has 55 employees and about a dozen very large customers who have been in deployment for quiet a while.

Coleman is a former hotshot from Sun Microsystems who used to run its systems software operations - notably transforming SunOS into Solaris. He went on to co-found BEA Systems in 1995 (he's the B in BEA) along with Ed Scott and Alfred Chuang. Ironically, BEA is now part of Oracle and it looks like Sun will be before too long as well.

"I have talked with about a dozen companies, all the usual suspects," Coleman told Forbes. "There are one or two possible buyers, and a couple of flickers of interest, but pretty soon I have to think about what's best for my shareholders."

Cassatt, which was founded in 2003, is still operating and supporting its customers while Coleman sorts through his options for the company, which according to the report has burned through nearly $100m in venture capital as it sought to establish itself as a Switzerland of sorts in the management of virtual servers and cloud computing infrastructure.

Coleman was not shy in the Forbes story about assigning blame for Cassatt's failure, saying that the "big guys copied my story" by undercutting Cassatt's value proposition. He added that the even more difficult barrier was getting companies to let go of their current methods for deploying and managing physical and now virtual servers.

Coleman said that it was difficult to get companies to deploy the Cassatt tools beyond a proof of concept or to get them to do anything beyond an energy audit in their data centers. Cassatt has never been particularly open about what its Collage and then Active Response VM management tools cost. That doesn't make Cassatt an exception, but more like the rule among systems management tool makers.

But some of the problem might have to do with the fact that virtualization management tools cost too damned much, just like physical server management tools have for the past 15 years, and with the economy melting like the polar ice caps, maybe customers have other issues they are wrestling with.

What seems clear is that Warbug Pincus and New Enterprise Associates, the two VCs backing Cassatt, have run out of patience, and if Sun Microsystems had not made such a mess itself, Coleman would have already sold Cassatt to Sun a few months back. Perhaps Oracle has some spare change laying around to do a deal? Chief executive officer Larry Ellison seems to be happy to buy up anything Microsoft and IBM don't already control. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.