Feeds

Apple medical leave halts Jobsian jet-setting

But cult head still 'deeply involved'

Reducing security risks from open source software

Steve Jobs has become quite the homebody. His private jet has remained grounded during his absence from day-to-day duties at Apple.

This bit of news was buried in a footnote to Apple's 58-page Form 10-Q quarterly report that was filed with the US Securities and Exchange commission on Thursday.

According to the footnote, Apple maintains a reimbursement agreement with Jobs for expenses incurred when he uses the Gulfstream V that the company's board of directors gave him in January of 2000, presumably in appreciation for saving Apple's bacon.

The SEC filing notes that during the first three months of this year - while Jobs has been on medical leave - those reimbursements totaled exactly zero. For the three months before that, the reimbursements were a mere $4,000. Contrast that with the same periods a year ago, when Jobs was reimbursed $30,000 for the quarter and a hefty $580,000 for six months.

Meaning either that Jobs has been absent from globetrotting negotiations with parts suppliers in Europe and Asia and not meeting face-to-face with Chinese telecoms or that he's flying the friendly skies on commercial routes - which is vanishingly unlikely for such a instantly recognizable and deeply private man.

Odds are that he's simply kicking back and taking care of himself.

But the word on the street is that Jobs is still deeply involved in management decisions at Apple. According to a recent report in The Wall Street Journal, he's "working on new iPhone models and a portable device that is smaller than its current laptop computers but bigger than the iPhone or iPod Touch."

Which would be encouraging. If it were true.

No one outside of Jobs's close circle knows for sure. Apple is famous - notorious? - for its careful management of information. Possibly Jobs is, indeed, creatively shepherding the development of Apple's next generation of groundbreaking products. Perhaps he's not.

For his sake, we hope it's the former. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple ran off to IBM
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Nadella: Apps must run on ALL WINDOWS – PCs, slabs and mobes
Phone egg, meet desktop chicken - your mother
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations
Vows to uphold 'zero tolerance' policy on underage workers
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.