Feeds

IBMware priced 40% higher on Nehalem

More power to you. More money to Big Blue

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

If you are thinking about running IBM's systems, database, or middleware software on one of Intel's new "Nehalem EP" Xeon 3500 or 5000 series chips, brace yourself for some price increases.

For nearly three years, IBM has been selling selected software from its Software Group on various server platforms on a quasi-performance-related pricing scheme based on something called Processor Value Units, which might as well be called "We Just Guessed" considering how much a PVU has to do with the actual performance of the processors upon which the software is supposedly priced.

This week, IBM announced PVU ratings for the new quad-core Xeon 3500 processors, which are put into single-socket boxes, as well as on the Xeon 5500s, which are low-speed dual-core and higher-speed quad-core chips designed for two-socket machines. As we have been reporting, the performance improvement for servers using Nehalem EP chips can be as high as twice that as the quad-core Xeon 5400 processors they replace - provided you do some application tuning and recompiling - and can rival the performance of four-socket server using Intel's six-core "Dunnington" Xeon 7400 processors.

Given all this, you would think that IBM's PVU rating for the Nehalem EPs would be twice that of the Xeon 5400s. Ah, but it's not that simple. In some ways, what IBM has done is more fair than that and, in others, less fair.

The point behind the PVU scheme is to lump processor types and families together and give them a single rating so IBM's Software Group sales people don't have to resort to performance benchmarks to price the company's software. Simplification is good for sales people. And thus far, it has been good for companies using Intel's Xeon x64 chips as well as Advanced Micro Devices' Opteron equivalents.

<p.All Xeons and all Opterons were rated at 50 PVUs per core, regardless of core speed. That is certainly attractive compared to IBM's dual-core Power6 processors used in midrange and high-end AIX, Linux, and i platforms or the quad-core z10 processors, which are rated at 120 PVUs per core. But with the Nehalem EPs, the PVU ratings have been kicked up to 70 per core, and that represents a 40 per cent increase in software costs for customers that migrate software from earlier Xeons or Opterons to the new Nehalem EPs.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Next page: PVU on the table

More from The Register

next story
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
The DRUGSTORES DON'T WORK, CVS makes IT WORSE ... for Apple Pay
Goog Wallet apparently also spurned in NFC lockdown
Desktop Linux users beware: the boss thinks you need to be managed
VMware reveals VDI for Linux desktops plan, plus China lab to do the development
IBM, backing away from hardware? NEVER!
Don't be so sure, so-surers
Hey - who wants 4.8 TERABYTES almost AS FAST AS MEMORY?
China's Memblaze says they've got it in PCIe. Yow
Microsoft brings the CLOUD that GOES ON FOREVER
Sky's the limit with unrestricted space in the cloud
This time it's SO REAL: Overcoming the open-source orgasm myth with TODO
If the web giants need it to work, hey, maybe it'll work
'ANYTHING BUT STABLE' Netflix suffers BIG Europe-wide outage
Friday night LIVE? Nope. The only thing streaming are tears down my face
Google roolz! Nest buys Revolv, KILLS new sales of home hub
Take my temperature, I'm feeling a little bit dizzy
Storage array giants can use Azure to evacuate their back ends
Site Recovery can help to move snapshots around
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.