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Ocarina making dedupe music with BlueArc

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Hardware-accelerated file storage supplier BlueArc is to sell Ocarina deduplication hardware integrated with its Titan 3000 product.

BlueArc's Titan 3000 is a network-attached storage (NAS) product offering very fast access, up to 4PB of capacity, and tiered storage embracing fast Fibre Channel drives, bulk storage SATA drives, and WORM (Write Once Read Many) drives.

Ocarina is a startup producing post-process, block-level, deduplication technology that has the unique capability of reducing the size of audio and image files using proprietary mathamatical algorithms. Standard deduplication products from suppliers such as Data Domain, Sepaton, FalconStor, Quantum and others cannot dedupe JPEG and MPEG files as Ocarina's file-type specific technology can.

A BlueArc customer will take files from the primary or upper tiers of the Titan and, using BlueArc's lengthily-named Data Migrator with External Cross Volume Links, move files on a policy basis to the Ocarina Optimizer for BlueArc hardware appliance. It will dedupe the files and pass them back to the Titan for storage in a lower tier. They can be restored up the tiers by BlueArc's Dynamic Read Caching which, BlueArc claims, eliminates data latency as users access the data.

It also claims that this will increase Titan's effective capacity up to ten times more than the nearest competitive primary data dedupe offering, thought to be NetApp with its ASIS technology.

BlueArc hopes to find customers for this in the oil and gas discovery, media and entertainment, life sciences, visual effects, and Internet services markets.

Hitachi Data Systems has a reselling agreement with BlueArc and may well take this OEM addition to BlueArc's product line. Ocarina also has agreements with Isilon and HP for its technology.

BlueArc will make the Ocarina Optimizer for BlueArc available from mid-May onwards. ®

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