Feeds

Lotus offers to end e-car silent running

A Tesla that sounds like a TIE Fighter, anyone?

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

'Leccy Tech Lotus has announced a raft of systems designed to solve all your pesky car noise problems. And that includes the owners of e-cars, whose worry is that their vehicles make no noise whatsoever. The systems are being developed in partnership with Harman Becker Automotive Systems - and seem to have all bases covered.

Drivers of cars powered by good old internal combustion engines will be able to opt for the Road Noise Cancellation (RNC) and Engine Order Cancellation (EOC) systems, which use a car's stereo to generate a sound signal that cancels out the noise generated by road rumble and by the engine.

RNC apparently deals with noise at frequencies below 250Hz, while EOC is tuned to cancel out the frequencies associated with “ignition events”. The system takes readings from sensors in the engine bay, attached to the suspension and from microphones in the cabin and then uses clever software algorithms them work out the best way to cancel them all out. This all takes place in a few thousandths of a second so is constantly variable and, more importantly, has no effect on the hi-fi or on conversations being held between cabin occupants.

There's no news on whether the system can be tuned to cancel out the noise made by a couple of screaming kids in the back seats, though.

Of more interest to e-car enthusiasts is the External Electronic Sound Synthesis system that uses speakers fixed to the front and rear of a vehicle to broadcast a speed-variable imitation of a car engine and thus hopefully reduce the number of pedestrians who simply step out in front of you because they didn't hear you coming.

True to its performance car heritage, Lotus suggests the sound of a flat-6 or V8 - the latter chosen by UK e-car maker Lightning, we recall.

According to Lotus, “more futuristic sounds for electric vehicles can be created using sampled sounds and generated waveforms”, which will be handy for those who want their Tesla Roadster to sound like a TIE fighter.

Taking things one step further is the Internal Electronic Sound Synthesis (IESS) system, which means e-car drivers can't claim a similar degree of aural ignorance when plod pulls them over for speeding. IESS once again uses the car's entertainment system but this time to replicate the sound of petrol-driven locomotion inside the vehicle cabin – a car's “sound DNA” as Lotus call it.

Lotus says that working systems are ready for “product implementation and manufacture” but made no comment regarding how soon – of even if - the system would make it onto the shelves at Halfords. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.