Feeds

Adobe turns on to Flash TVs

Skinning up another consumer end-point

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

It's the user interface stupid! Adobe is working to bring its Flash web animation and video viewer to the living room via a new run-time system for HD TVs, set-top boxes, Blu-ray players and other connected living room devices.

This is all part of bringing Internet content into the TV viewing experience. The Adobe strategy is an embodiment of the view that for TV viewers the remote control is at the limit of user interface complexity, and the very last thing they want is to have the PC experience right there on the TV screen. That would mean having a keyboard on your lap and becoming au fait with either the Windows (are you serious?), the Mac OSX (better) or the Linux (yikes!) user interfaces. From the TV viewers' point of view the 'G' in the PC GUI stands for ghastly.

What Adobe is doing is to enable Internet-connected TV peripherals, or some HD TVs themselves, to receive web animation and video content and then play it on the TV through a simple pick-box-and-remote-control-click interface. It will mean, for example, that all the You Tube video catalogue can be seen on the TV instead of just the TV-encoded subset. TV viewers will also be able to use digital widgets, dinky little web applications, as well, all without having to endure enjoy the Internet browser experience.

Adobe has partnerships for its new Flash Platform for the Digital Home product with System on Chips (SoC) vendors, such as Intel, OEMs, cable operators and content providers including Atlantic Records, Broadcom, Comcast, Disney Interactive Media Group, Intel, Netflix, STMicroelectronics, The New York Times Company, NXP Semiconductors, Sigma Designs, and others, as it extends the reach of its Flash platform and so builds momentum to deny Microsoft's competing SilverLight technology market room.

Flash is already available for smart phones and as well as for web browsers.

The new flash runtime is available immediately to OEMs, with the first devices and SoC platforms supporting this TV-optimised Flash technology expected to ship in the second half of the year. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?