Feeds

Wikimedia becomes latest to ban Phorm

They'd have made a lovely couple

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

The Wikimedia Foundation has asked Phorm to exclude all its domains and websites - including Wikipedia - from Phorm's BT trials, because it considers such scanning to be an infringement of its users' privacy.

Phorm's automated reply said it was likely the ban would go into effect within 48 hours.

Earlier this week Amazon took the same view and asked Phorm to refrain from scanning its pages.

The Open Rights Group welcomed the bookseller's decision. The ORG has written to Microsoft, Google, Facebook, AOL/Bebo, Yahoo! and eBay asking them to take similar action and protect their users.

Phorm runs a system to allow webmasters to get their sites excluded from its trials.

The company suffered another blow this week when the European Commission announced infringement action against the UK government for failing to take action over secret trials run by Phorm and BT.

There has also been criticism of the dual role of Kip Meek - Phorm director and adviser to the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?