Feeds

Pirate Bay guilty verdict: Now what?

Setting sail for the Supreme Court

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

BrokeP Mountain

Elsewhere, the obvious tech industry suspects have waded in to share their thoughts on today's judgment.

A spokesman for the London Internet Exchange (LINX) told us:

“This verdict is vindication of our belief to pursue the infringers through the court and not hold intermediates such as internet service providers responsible for the actions of third parties.”

The Federation Against Software Theft's CEO John Lovelock chimed in with:

“From a law and order perspective FAST applauds this sentence. By enabling unscrupulous users to find downloads online illegally for free, The Pirate Bay has cost the legitimate economy by taking away revenue for content creators, reducing tax revenue and possibly even costing jobs at these firms.”

But, if the trial would have taken place in Blighty the case against the BitTorrent site would have probably fallen flat on its face, according to law firm Beachcroft LLP.

"Current legislation simply does not address these kinds of online service. Any action against Pirate Bay type services would be doomed to fail under current English law," said Robin Fry, copyright specialist at Beachcroft.

He referred to legislation stretching back to a Musical Copyright Act of 1906, "which only criminalises use of 'plates' or articles (which could now extend to software) but only if they were designed for copying specific copyright works."

Over on the other side of the pond law professor Michael A. Carrier noted that "the [entertainment] industry has not always been at the forefront of adopting new technologies and embracing disruptive innovation," he said.

"It could benefit from devoting as much effort towards innovation as it does to litigation."

For many that has been the sticking point in the case against The Pirate Bay, which first kicked off in 2006 when Swedish authorities raided server sites and confiscated tech gear from several server locations.

But the entertainment industry will remain as bloody-minded as BitTorrent players about who owns its Intellectual Property, and the ramifications of that will ultimately outlive the verdict meted out today. ®

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Delaware pair nabbed for getting saucy atop Mexican eatery
Burrito meets soft taco in alleged rooftop romp outrage
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.