Feeds

Police, Cameras, Inaction!

Being filmed never worried Morse

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Oddly enough, despite a massive police presence and the police commitment to recording as much of every demonstration as possible for future reference, evidence of these incidents surfaced not on any official recording, but on film shot by passers-by.

Readers with longer memories may remember how a similar effect appears to have affected official cameras around the time of the Stockwell incident, in which police marksmen shot and killed innocent Brazilian Jean Charles de Menezes. According to the police, CCTV footage that might have shed some light on events apparently never happened, or was wiped shortly after.

We could go on. There is the incident outside the Greek Embassy last December, in which a policeman in no uncertain terms interferes with a photographer going about his job. There is the incident reported yesterday, in which an Austrian tourist, Mr Klaus Matzka, appears to have been made - unlawfully - to delete shots of a bus station. Or a little further back, this footage from independent film-maker Darren Pollard in Birmingham shows that police secretiveness is not restricted to the Met.

In connection with this case, a spokeswoman for the West Midlands police said that as no formal complaint was received at the time, no action was taken. She added: "Police Officers receive training in the Laws of the UK when they are first recruited, and are sent on regular refresher courses throughout their career."

This is similar to responses we receive whenever such an incident comes to light. We have also heard from serving officers who are beginning to spot the pattern and are very worried about what all this is doing to public confidence. One view they regularly express is that part of the problem lies in the increasing formalisation of police-public encounters.

Whatever the precise reasons, our own sense is that a tipping point is being reached. Police excuses are wearing increasingly thin. If the issue is not addressed soon – as the systemic problem we suspect it is - then the police will only have themselves to blame for a massive loss of public belief in their integrity. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.