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Jaunty Jackalope release candidate unleashed

Claims of distro riches

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Jaunty Jackalope has sprung a step closer, with the release of final pre-production code for Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop and Server, and Ubuntu Netbook Remix edition.

The Ubuntu 9.04 release candidate was kicked out Thursday afternoon. The Ubuntu team behind it has reported that the release candidate is "complete, stable, and suitable for testing by any user", but that it does provide the caveat that there are still a few known bugs.

They have promised to squash the bugs before the final release, scheduled for a week from now - April 23. The over-eager among you, though, can get your code fix here.

Expectations for Ubuntu 9.04, which hit beta at the end of last month, are high thanks to across-the-board improvements.

The Jackalope sees refinements in the interface and on performance for desktops and that all-important netbook market, while on the server you can deploy Amazon Machine Images for your own personal Amazon cloud.

According to one article there are five big things to look out for in Ubuntu Linux 9.04. They are: X.Org server 1.6/GNOME 2.26; the Evolution 2.26.1 mailer, calendar, contact manager, and communications utility; improved boot times; the fast and stable Ext4 file system; and the 2.6.28 kernel with which Ext4 works.

Also singing Jackalope's praises was Ubuntu specialist System 76. Company president Carl Richell has singled out its improved boot time along with its "slick new notification system, and easy integration with Active Directory networks."

In an article on Works With U Richell said: "Businesses can quickly and securely deploy email, file and print, web, and DNS services within their network. Ubuntu 9.04 Server also easily integrates into Active Directory domains - a valuable management feature for existing infrastructures."

System 76 is a poster child for Works With U and Ubuntu, claiming first-quarter revenue in 2009 increased 61 per cent over the same period last year thanks to Ubuntu.

Of course, since System 76 is a private company, such a growth claim is somewhat amorphous - not knowing what the baseline was, we can't know what the actual growth numbers are in pounds or dollars. But even conceding that imprecision, a 61 per cent growth during the ongoing Meltdown ain't too shabby.

In related news, if you're a long-time Ubuntu user, remember that Ubuntu 7.10 reaches end-of-life this Saturday - meaning the end of Ubuntu Security Notices that include info about or updates for that distro.

The Ubuntu team giveth, and the Ubuntu team taketh away. ®

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