Feeds

Pizza-polluting YouTube plonkers soil Domino's

Internet bogey bandits wreak corporate havoc

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

Two US Domino's pizza employees who filmed themselves performing a gross-out food prank have been fired, but not before the clammy hand of Web 2.0 ensured their larks would live in infamy.

The salami-slaves' handiwork, uploaded to YouTube and viewed a million times before its removal, was quickly spluttered all over the internet, resulting in rather embarrassing Google results for Domino's, the New York Times gravely reports. Five of the 12 top results on the first page of Google contained some reference to it, while Twitter fairly lit up with eager discussion of the caper (Caper! Like on a pizza! Ha! Yes!) and succeeded in drawing attention to its boring, self-important self as usual.

The pair of geniuses, 31-year-old Kristy Hammonds and 32-year-old Michael Setzer, were working at a Domino's franchise in Conover, North Carolina, when they decided to liven up their day with a little health-regulation horseplay. Hammonds, helpfully clad in a Domino's hat and explaining "That's how we roll at Domino's," wielded the camera in the kitchen as Setzer put cheese up his nose, sneezed copiously over sandwiches and performed other bodily-emission-based, ingredient-befouling acts we blanche to describe. They were quickly identified after the video went internet-batshit, as these things will.

Domino's went quickly into damage-control mode, inevitably firing the employees and producing its own video of apology and reassurance, as well as succumbing to the inevitable and delving into Twitter. However, the palliative words of chief executive Michael Doyle could only flutter against the mighty opinion-forming fist of the internet - the research firm YouGov found that consumer perception of the brand had gone from positive to negative in days. (Personally we don't give a stuff as long as they keep bringing us that awesome garlic dippy sauce that gives the crust a whole new lease of life.)

Setzer and Hammonds insisted the besmirched comestibles were never delivered to the public, but they were nevertheless charged with "delivering prohibited foods", and the branch was closed for decontamination. Hammonds sent a hand-wringing email explaining “It was fake and I wish that everyone knew that!!!!... I AM SOO SORRY!” - but no amount of judicious use of exclamation marks and caps lock could convince a now squicked-out public.

The video was removed from YouTube after Hammonds, amusingly, filed a copyright claim. But naturellement, El Reg has located the footage for your viewing pleasure (thanks be to LiveLeak).

Domino's is now planning to file suit against their former employees, according to spokesman Tim McIntyre, who shrugged to the NYT: “We got blindsided by two idiots with a video camera and an awful idea... What we missed was the perpetual mushroom effect of viral sensations." We presume he intended no pun. ®

Bogeynote

Nul points for originality - West Midlands Subway sarnie-stuffer and champion pillock Richard Shannon pioneered this kind of hilarity earlier this year, although lettuce was his chosen victim.

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Spanish village called 'Kill the Jews' mulls rebranding exercise
Not exactly attractive to the Israeli tourist demographic
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Happy 40th Playmobil: Reg looks back at small, rude world of our favourite tiny toys
Little men straddle LOHAN, attend tiny G20 Summit... ah, sweet memories...
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest
New minifigs like Monster Fighters are turning kids to the dark side
Dark SITH LORD 'Darth Vader' joins battle to rule, er, Ukraine
Only I can 'make an empire out of a republic' intones presidential candidate
Chinese company counters pollution by importing fresh air
Citizens line up for bags of that sweet, sweet mountain air
Google asks April Fools: Want a job? Be our 'Pokemon Master'
Mountain View is prankin' like it's 1999...
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.