Feeds

Scammers use Ford to drive users to scareware sites

Mondeo man offered malware by black-hat SEO fiends

The essential guide to IT transformation

Scareware scammers are trying to game search engines into promoting crudware sites when a surfer searches for information on Ford cars.

Attacks of this type, themed around events such as the recent tragic death of actress Natasha Richardson, are becoming increasingly commonplace. However, attacks themed around a single well-known brand have to date been extremely rare, if not unprecedented.

The Ford scareware campaign features around one million links, all targeting the Ford Motor Company, designed to trick search engines into promoting malicious pages towards the top of search results. Malvertised pages are punting a rogue anti-virus product, called MS AntiSpyware 2009. The malicious application attempts the scare users into buying software of little of no utility on the basis of fraudulent scan results that report systems are infected, whether they are or not.

A full write-up of the attack, including screenshots and list of targeted search terms, can be found in a posting on Panda Security's blog here.

Rogue security (AKA scareware) packages are growing in prevalence, as they become one of the most straightforward ways for hackers to make big money from poor internet security. The head-count of scareware packages in circulation rose from 2,850 in July to 9,287 in December 2008, according to the latest figures from the Anti-Phishing Working Group. Last week Microsoft reported that its malicious software removal tool had detected two rogue scareware packages, FakeXPA and FakeSecSen, on more than 1.5 million PCs in the second half of 2008 alone. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
Think crypto hides you from spooks on Facebook? THINK AGAIN
Traffic fingerprints reveal all, say boffins
Rupert Murdoch says Google is worse than the NSA
Mr Burns vs. The Chocolate Factory, round three!
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.