Feeds

Intel demos Moorestown, embeds Nehalem

Software still chasing hardware

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Intel has demonstrated that its long-awaited mobile platform is meeting its power-saving goals, disclosed upcoming low-power Xeon 5500s for storage and blades, and pointed toward a future in which programmers might actually use all the threads and cores the company's hardware is throwing at them.

At IDF Beijing - an event that was cut down to one day due to "current economic circumstances and business pressures the industry is facing globally" - Intel's Ultra Mobility chieftain Anand Chandrasekher demoed a platform designed for mobile internet devices (MIDs) in which the company's new 2GHz Atom Z550 processor and its fellows might find a home.

Codenamed Moorestown, the platform was announced two years ago, but won't see the light of day until 2010. Apparently, a lot of its development time is being spent driving its power needs down - and equally apparently, with some success.

Chandrasekher's demo was a side-by-side showdown between a Moorsetown prototype and a current Atom-based system which showed a greater than 10X improvement in power-miserliness for the upcoming MID platform.

A demo is, of course, merely a demo - but LG Electronics, for one, has already showed enough faith in the Moorsetown platform to announce what it calls a "next generation" Moblin-based MID with phone capabilities, to be released soon after Moorsetown ships.

Pat Gelsinger, SVP and general manager of Intel's Digital Enterprise Group, announced embedded versions of the Xeon 5500 that debuted last week. This embedded-processor line, code-named Jasper Forest and scheduled to appear in early 2010, will be designed for use in NAS and SAN systems, communcations, and what the company refers to as "ultra-dense blades." They'll come in single, dual, and quad-core configs, with power requirements ranging from 23 to 85 watts.

Intel's Larrabee CPU/GPU mash-up also had its moment in the spotlight, with a focus on how programmers might get the most out of this complex, hyper-parallelized beast after it appears in late 2009 or early 2010. Gelsinger pointed out that the C++ Larrabee Prototype Library is now available for help in learning the hybrid chip's new LRBni instructions.

More programming help is coming from what Gelsinger identified as Ct Technology, aka C/C++ for Throughput Computing. This future parallelized-code optimization technology is begin designed for a day when, as Intel predicts, progammers will need to code for hundreds to thousands of hardware threads and thousands of software threads.

As we've noted before, hardware is getting well ahead of software in the new multithreaded multicore world. Here's hoping that Intel's Ct technologists can help - such a development might help lift the industry out of its "current economic circumstances and business pressures." ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch
Full specs for wrist-mounted device here ... but who'll buy it?
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.