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Intel puts five Xeons on death row

Nehalem's first casualties

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Intel's newly released Nehalem EP-core Xeon processors have inflicted their first casualties: five older Xeons are scheduled to be phased out.

According to Intel's Product Change Notification #109186-00 (PDF), you'll be able to buy these death-row Xeons in a retail box until January 9, 2010.

The Xeons set for the chopping block all have 1333MHz frontside buses. The two parts with X in their product number are 45nm, 95-watt Yorkfield parts, the three without are 65nm, 65-watt Conroes.

The doomed processors are:

  • Quad-core 2.66GHz Xeon X3350 with 12MB L2 cache
  • Quad-core 2.5GHz Xeon X3320 with 6MB L2 cache
  • Dual-core 3GHz Xeon 3085 with 4MB L2 cache
  • Dual-core 2.66GHz Xeon 3075 with 4MB L2 cache
  • Dual-core 2.33GHz Xeon 3065 with 4MB L2 cache

In microprocessor evolution as in nature, there are winners and there are losers. According to Intel, these parts are being phased out because "market demand ... has shifted to other Intel processors."

AMD was not mentioned. ®

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