Feeds
85%
Nokia E75

Nokia E75

The Finns' first full slide-out alpha keyboard

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Review The E75 is the first Nokia smartphone to feature a slide-out Qwerty keyboard and style-wise it would appear to be a sort of cross between the conventionally sliding E66 and the E90 Communicator – the latest incarnation of Nokia's long-established hinged Qwerty-keyboard business phones.

Nokia E75

Nokia's E75: a slightly tubby candybar...

The 2.5in, 320 x 240, 16m-colour screen doesn't measure up to the E90's 800 x 352 beast, but at least it has the advantage of looking like a conventional phone, and Nokia's obviously done some sterling work in keeping it relatively thin - for a keyboard slider, anyway - at 112 x 50 x 14mm. It weighs in at a respectable 139g as opposed to the E90's trouser-straining 210g.

Around the sides are a micro USB port and Micro SD memory card slot - it comes with a 4GB card to boost the phone's 50MB of on-board memory - both covered with rubberised grommets, plus camera shutter and volume buttons, a dedicated voice commands button and a 3.5mm audio jack at the top. Round the back is a lightly ridged metallic cover, similar to the one on the E66, but this time with a 3.2Mp camera with LED flash and self-portrait mirror.

Unusually for a Nokia business phone, there's no infrared port and Nokia has again left off its power button à la the E63 – you hold down the call end button, just like almost everyone else's phones these days.

The keypad is a little cramped, especially the three keys right at the bottom, which can be a bit tricky to reach with your thumb. Three of Nokia's standard E-series shortcut keys - home, calendar and messaging - are ranged around the square navpad, but contacts has been replaced with a delete button, which seems an odd choice for a phone with an alphanumeric keyboard, especially since there are a couple of soft-menu keys present, one of which could easily serve as a delete button for when you're punching in phone numbers.

Nokia E75

...turns into an HTC-style Qwerty slider

Which brings us neatly to the keyboard. It slides out to the left with a crisp, assisted action. The upper part of the phone feels a little flimsy when the keyboard is exposed - so that's where they've saved the space - but there's no worry that it might snap or anything. It's probably just that we're used to heavier brutes.

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share
Not four. Point four. Count yer booty again, Microsoft
Getting to the BOTTOM of the great office seating debate
Belay that toil, me hearty, and park your scurvy backside
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
In a spin: Samsung accuses LG exec of washing machine SABOTAGE
Rival electronic giant tries to iron out allegations
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.