Feeds
80%
Apple Mac Pro

Apple Mac Pro

Goes like the proverbial off a shovel

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Review The recent updates to Apple’s iMac and Mac Mini desktop systems rather suggested that the company was treading water. Both machines sported new graphics chips and faster system buses, but their processor speeds had barely changed and there was a steady trend towards higher prices that suggested Apple was planning to weather the recession by padding its profit margins as much as possible.

Apple Mac Pro

Apple's Mac Pro:

The profit margin on the new Mac Pro can’t be that bad either, but Apple’s early adoption of Intel’s latest quad-core, 64-bit ‘Nehalem’ Xeon 5500 processor does represent a significant step forward for a machine that’s only had one other upgrade since its launch back in 2006.

At first glance, the new Mac Pro looks identical to its predecessors. The gleaming aluminium tower design is unchanged. Forget the diminutive Mac Mini and the slimline iMac – this is a full-scale tower chassis that would gladden the heart of any PC fanboy. It measures 500mm high, 200mm wide and 475mm back to front. Those handles moulded into the top panel are there for a reason: the unit weighs in at close to 20kg.

The perforated front panel is adorned with a power switch, two USB 2.0 ports, two Firewire 800 ports and a headphone socket. There’s also an 8x DVD burner and a spare bay for a second optical drive. Round the back of the machine are three additional USB 2.0 ports and two more Firewire 800 ports, as well as inputs and outputs for both digital and analogue audio, two Gigabit Ethernet ports, and both DVI and DisplayPort video connectors.

And, uniquely in the Mac range, the Mac Pro also has three PCI Express slots that can be used to upgrade the system - two PCIe x16 and one PCIe x4 - as well as three additional 3.5in drive bays for adding extra storage.

Apple Mac Pro

Easily accesible interior

We have to admit that we were rather impressed that the machine didn’t crash when we accidentally opened up the wrong drive bay and pulled out the hard disk by mistake. We just slotted the disk back into place and the machine seemed to carry on without a hiccup. But, as impressive as that was, we can’t help thinking that it’d be a good idea to let people screw the main system disk into place when idiots like us are around.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.