Feeds

US states may seek Microsoft anti-trust extension

It's Windows Vista wot dunnit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Some US states may ask for continued supervision of Microsoft, to ensure the software giant isn't breaching the government's 2001 anti-trust agreement.

Microsoft oversight is due to expire on November 12, but states that signed on to the Department of Justice's (DoJ's) deal with Microsoft may now seek an extension that would last until 2012, according to a report.

States, lead by California and New York, cited complaints from unnamed hardware and software companies over Windows Vista promotional complaints.

Microsoft reportedly said that since the January court hearing it had ended the Windows Vista promotions that had cause the complaints.

The states would need to ask presiding district judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly to extend The Microsoft oversight. The states are reportedly "thinking very hard" about this.

Microsoft is no stranger to legal action over its Windows Vista claims, of course, landing in hot water with consumers over the Windows Vista "capable" program.

Enforcement of the anti-trust deal is different, though. It's easy to question the need for continued oversight eight years after the DoJ's anti-trust case, and you can - easily - argue that the pace of development leaves regulators and oversight trailing in the wake of "progress."

In many ways, Microsoft's certainly adopted such an attitude and clearly thought oversight was something it could pay lip service to during those early days of the settlement. It must have seemed like a wrist slap compared to the original break up order from trial judge Thomas Penfield Jackson.

However, Microsoft has been repeatedly upbraided by those monitoring the company, and it's been forced to modify its behavior and make a more concerted attempt to be open as a result.

State attorneys overseeing the Microsoft Communications Protocol Program (MCPP), created under the settlement to license server and client APIs and communications protocols to outsiders, quickly forced Microsoft to revise the prices it charged to license its software for interoperability and make documentation clear and less onerous to licensees.

Microsoft will always argue for more restrictions on licensing in order to "differentiate" itself against competitors and to deliver a "compelling" integrated experience for its users.

If the complaints surrounding the latest Windows Vista campaign are true, though, clearly Microsoft's old habits die-hard. The only question will be whether three years is sufficient. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
Yes, Virginia, there IS a W3C HTML5 standard – as of now, that is
You asked for it! You begged for it! Then you gave up! And now it's HERE!
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.