Feeds

Aussies backtrack on firewall plans

Conroy racks up another gaffe

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

The Aussie communications minister Stephen Conroy seems to be moving away from his planned test of a compulsory internet filter.

But Conroy has also made some rather dubious comments about an ongoing court case involving one of the ISPs which publicly ridiculed his planned Great Aussie Firewall.

Conroy told SBS's Insight programme he wanted to tighten rules for inclusion on the blacklist. Versions of the list which ended up on Wikileaks included anti-abortion pages and business sites, as well as fairly ordinary pornography.

Conroy said: "Refused classification is the mandatory aspect, and then parents - if the technology allows, if we can work our way through the technical issues - then parents would be given a range of options of other material that they can choose to block for their children."

The earlier leaked list from the Australian Communications and Media Authority included several images and websites which would not have been refused classification. Conroy also said he understood the concern that the secret list was being drawn up by "faceless bureaucrats".

Conroy said: "What I am looking at at the moment is a system whereby the Classification Board can have a role in making that final determination." So if a complaint about a website was made, ACMA would pass that site onto the Classifcation Board.

The Classification Board grants certificates to films and DVDs, or refuses to do so. Its decisions are made public and can be appealed - Baise-Moi, for instance, was refused classification.

In another apparent gaffe yesterday, Conroy commented on an ongoing court action. Various film and television rights organisations are suing ISP iinet for allowing its customers to download copyright material. iiNet withdrew from the Aussie Firewall trial because it was: "fundamentally flawed, a waste of taxpayers’ money and would not work."

Speaking to a telecoms conference yesterday, Conroy said iiNet's defence, "belongs in a Yes Minister episode", the Sydney Morning Herald reported.

iiNet's lawyer described the comments as grossly improper and likely to prejudice an ongoing court case.

There is a transcript and recording of Conroy's TV appearance is here. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.