Feeds

Amazon puts stuffed elephant in sky

Distributed data crunching for the masses

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Amazon has floated a new data-crunching cloud based on Hadoop, the stuffed elephant open-source phenomenon that attempts to mimic the distributed computing platform driving Google's online infrastructure.

Dubbed Amazon Elastic MapReduce, the new web service is a means of processing vast amounts of data "easily and cost-effectively." It sits Hadoop atop Amazon's existing compute and storage services, EC2 (elastic compute cloud) and S3 (simple storage service).

Amazon has long offered developers the power to run their own Hadoop implementations on its virtual data center. But its new service provides pre-packaged Hadoopiness.

"Some researchers and developers already run Hadoop on Amazon EC2, and many of them have asked for even simpler tools for large-scale data analysis," reads a canned statement from Adam Selipsky, VP of product management and developer relations for Amazon Web Services. "Amazon Elastic MapReduce makes crunching in the cloud much easier as it dramatically reduces the time, effort, complexity and cost of performing data-intensive tasks."

In 2004, Google published a paper describing a software framework called MapReduce that it developed for processing beaucoup data across distributed clusters of low-cost server hardware. Shortly after the paper was published, a developer named Doug Cutting launched an open-source project based on Google's description of MapReduce and its very own Google File System (GFS). He dubbed the project Hadoop, after his son's stuffed elephant.

Cutting's now on the payroll at Yahoo!, where Hadoop underpins at least a portion of Yahoo!'s infrastructure. And the technology is used by countless other online operations, including Facebook and Microsoft's Powerset search engine. A new startup calling itself Cloudera has now commercialized the platform.

Meanwhile, Amazon lets you run the platform on its virtual data center. And now, with Amazon Elastic MapReduce, it offers up immediate access to its own Hadoop implementation. "Using Amazon Elastic MapReduce, you can instantly provision as much or as little capacity as you like to perform data-intensive tasks for distributed applications such as web indexing, data mining, log file analysis, machine learning, financial analysis, scientific simulation, and bioinformatics research," the company says.

Amazon is also offering up sample applications for use on its new Hadoop cloud. As with existing Amazon Web Services, you pay for online compute and storage resources by the hour, as you go. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
AWS pulls desktop-as-a-service from the PC
Support for PCoIP protocol means zero clients can run cloudy desktops
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.