Feeds

Bloggers could squeak out of court reporting restrictions

Ignorance could be valid get-out. Unless you read this

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

Bloggers might be able to escape reporting restrictions on sensitive court cases because they have not been informed of the restrictions. An ongoing case about a boy said to have fathered a child at 12 years of age has highlighted the issue.

Reporting on that case has been restricted but foreign news outlets have carried stories about it, with versions of those stories appearing on websites accessible from the UK.

Some bloggers have picked up the stories and may be within their rights to publish while national newspapers cannot. The court order imposing the reporting restrictions says that it only applies to people who know about the restriction.

There is no central database of reporting restrictions, so while newspapers are informed of restrictions, bloggers generally are not, opening a legal loophole for their possible publishing of restricted information.

"The order does, in principle, apply to 'bloggers' because it applies to all persons who know that the order has been made," said James McBurney of Pinsent Masons, the law firm behind OUT-LAW.COM. "Bloggers, along with any other person or corporation are therefore prohibited from publishing any of the restricted material, but only if they know that it is in place to start with, which is where the difficulty arises: how are they supposed to know about it?"

One way people could find out about it is through the local authority involved in the case. It has the right to disseminate the Order, which would in turn bring it into force on anyone receiving it. The local authority would not discuss its dissemination of the Order.

"The major national and regional newspapers will almost certainly be served by [the council], however there is unlikely to be any wider service of the Order and I am unaware of any website or other information service which provides information on reporting restrictions which might be in place," said McBurney. "It is therefore almost certain that the average man on the street will be completely unaware of the reporting restriction order."

The Google News service republishes headlines and opening sentences of news stories to its users. A search for the name of the child in Google News, which was well publicised in coverage of the case before the Order, brings up the foreign stories carrying the forbidden information.

McBurney said that Google could be held responsible for that publishing of forbidden information.

"In terms of internet search engines, and any other entity involved in the chain of publication and distribution of the material, they too can theoretically be held liable for any user generated content on their webpage which publishes defamatory material, or material which is in breach of a court order and therefore in contempt of court," said McBurney. "Liability may also extend to publishers who link another, foreign site, the content of which would be a contempt of court in the UK."

Google said that it removes pages on request when shown the court order the pages allegedly violate.

"We investigate removal requests based on court order violations once the court order (and the pages they want us to remove that allegedly infringe on the court order) have been brought to our attention," said a Google spokesman. "To date, we have not received a court order relating to [this] case."

McBurney said that publishers and bloggers should take down material from a case once they find out that it is the subject of a reporting restriction.

"This is a difficult area to police, but such orders do remain realistic (and necessary) in the internet age," he said. "But they do rely on responsible and expeditious actions by ISPs and bloggers when and if they become aware of the existence of reporting restrictions and material on their website which potentially breaches the terms of reporting restrictions orders."

Copyright © 2009, OUT-LAW.com

OUT-LAW.COM is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
UK.gov's Open Source switch WON'T get rid of Microsoft, y'know
What do you mean, we've ditched Redmond in favour of IBM?!
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
US Social Security 'wasted $300 million on an IT BOONDOGGLE'
Scrutiny committee bods probe derailed database project
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Australia floats website blocks and ISP liability to stop copyright thieves
Big Content could get the right to order ISPs to stop traffic
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.