Feeds
75%
Samsung P3

Samsung P3

iPod Touch worrier?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Review After a little over a year as the standard bearer for Samsung's PMP range, it's time for the YP-P2, aka the Yepp P2, to retire. But is its replacement - the YP-P3 – an evolution or a revolution? And has it got what it takes to lure buyers away from the default purchases in the segment: the ubiquitous multifunction iPod Touch and the slightly esoteric but highly capable Cowon iAudio S9?

Samsung P3

Samsung's P3: phone-style UI

Physically, there is very little to chose between the P3 and P2. At 102 x52 x 10mm, it's identical in size other than being 2mm taller. At 96g, it weighs a mere 11g more than its predecessor. Samsung's policy of 'if it ain't broke...' continues with the screen which, at 3in in size and 480 x 272 in resolution, is again exactly as per the P2.

One obvious improvement is build quality. The P2 was a rather plastic affair but the P3 feels altogether more solid, thanks mainly to its brushed metal casing and glass screen.

External controls on the P3 have been shorn to a bare minimum, with only a power/lock switch and volume control on the top of the device and a proprietary Samsung USB port and 3.5mm headphones jack at the bottom.

That curious looking area you can see directly below the screen consisting of three dots and two arrows is actually just a swipe bar to bring up the music "mini player", which allows you to stop/play or skip a track while the P3 is doing something else.

Samsung P3

The dots and arrow icons

The P2's touchscreen UI was one of its weaker points. Not only did it not look particularly attractive but it was also a little clumsy and prone to either misinterpreting or ignoring commands. For the P3, Samsung has started with a clean sheet of paper - at least from a visual perspective - basing the UI on an icon and widget layout that will be immediately familiar to anyone who has used a Samsung Tocco, Pixon or Omnia phone. You even get the fully fledged haptic feedback system that Samsung fit to those same phones.

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Reg man looks through a Glass, darkly: Google's toy ploy or killer tech specs?
Tip: Put the shades on and you'll look less of a spanner
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
One step closer to ROBOT BUTLERS: Dyson flashes vid of VACUUM SUCKER bot
Latest cleaner available for world+dog in September
Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch
Full specs for wrist-mounted device here ... but who'll buy it?
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
Tim Cook in Applerexia fears: New MacBook THINNER THAN EVER
'Supply chain sources' give up the goss on new iLappy
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.