Feeds

Intel showcases 'transformational' Nehalem

It's the next Pentium Pro, apparently

Build a business case: developing custom apps

The lineup

Here's the Nehalem EP lineup, with their basic feeds and speeds (name, clock speed, core count, cache, wattage, bandwidth, and price each for 1,000-unit trays).

For two-socket servers and workstations:

  • W5580: 3.2 GHz, quad-core, 8 MB L2 cache, 130 watts, 6.4 GT/sec; $1,600
  • X5570: 2.93 GHz, quad-core, 8 MB L2 cache, 95 watts, 6.4 GT/sec; $1,386
  • X5560: 2.8 GHz, quad-core, 8 MB L2 cache, 95 watts, 6.4 GT/sec; $1,172
  • X5550: 2.66 GHz, quad-core, 8 MB L2 cache, 95 watts, 6.4 GT/sec; $958
  • E5540: 2.53 GHz, quad-core, 8 MB L2 cache, 80 watts, 5.86 GT/sec; $744
  • E5530: 2.4 GHz, quad-core, 8 MB L2 cache, 80 watts, 5.86 GT/sec; $530
  • E5520: 2.26 GHz, quad-core, 8 MB L2 cache, 80 watts, 5.86 GT/sec; $373
  • E5506: 2.13 GHz, quad-core, 4 MB L2 cache, 80 watts, 4.8 GT/sec; $266
  • E5504: 2 GHz, quad-core, 4 MB L2 cache, 80 watts, 4.8 GT/sec; $224
  • E5502: 1.86 GHz, dual-core, 4 MB L2 cache, 80 watts, 4.8 GT/sec; $188
  • L5520: 2.26 GHz, quad-core, 8 MB L2 cache, 60 watts, 5.86 GT/sec; $530
  • L5506: 2.13 GHz, quad-core, 4 MB L2 cache, 60 watts, 4.8 GT/sec; $423

For uniprocessor servers and workstations:

  • W3570: 3.2 GHz, quad-core, 8 MB L2 cache, 130 watts, 6.4 GT/sec; $999
  • W3540: 2.93 GHz, quad-core, 8 MB L2 cache, 130 watts, 4.8 GT/sec; $562
  • W3520: 2.66 GHz, quad-core, 8 MB L2 cache, 130 watts, 4.8 GT/sec; $284

And for embedded servers - core count, cache and bandwidth not yet known - which have a seven-year lifecycle as required by makers of embedded systems:

  • L5518: 2.13 GHz, 60 watts; $530
  • L5508: 2 GHz, 38 watts; $423

The Nehalem EP processor has just over 730 million transistors and is manufactured on a 45 nanometer Hi-K process. The Penryn microarchitecture that debuted in earlier Xeon processors has been tweaked, according to Gelsinger, including deeper out-of-order execution, branch prediction, and a slew of enhancements to make server virtualization have less overhead than it currently does.

But the virtualization software has to be tweaked to take full advantage of these new VT-d and related features, he cautioned. With the new virtualization features coupled with VMware's future vSphere virtualization hypervisor, four server makers (Cisco, IBM, Dell, and Inspire) have demonstrated about a 160 per cent improvement in performance on the VMark virtualization benchmark from VMware compared to prior "Harpertown" Xeon 5400 servers.

"Our goal is to get native performance on virtual machines," explained Gelsinger, but he conceded that Intel may not be able to get the overhead all the way down to zero.

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Next page: (Semi-)Turbo Boost

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Microsoft says 'weird things' can happen during Windows Server 2003 migrations
Fix coming for bug that makes Kerberos croak when you run two domain controllers
Cisco says network virtualisation won't pay off everywhere
Another sign of strain in the Borg/VMware relationship?
VVOL update: Are any vendors NOT leaping into bed with VMware?
It's not yet been released but everyone thinks it's the dog's danglies
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.