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The Open Cloud Manifesto in full

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This is the text of the Open Cloud Manifesto - it came from someone who disagrees with its sentiments.

Maybe there are shades of the Aperi process here with companies feeling they are being bulldozed into signing something they haven't had a hand in developing?

On the other hand, expecting Microsoft to join in with a bunch of Unix/Linux-loving competitors in an open cloud interoperability effort could be bonkers. In fact the process of engaging with Microsoft could have been designed to irritate the Redmond boys and have them reject the standard draft thereby putting them in the non-cloud interoperability camp. Cue loud criticisms from the pro-interoperability camp which might just include Cisco, EMC and VMware.

We might call this a Maritz-type marketing play around standards in fact - seeing as VMware boss Paul Maritz is an ex-Microsoftie and knows its standard marketing moves.

Whatever, here is the text:

The Open Cloud Manifesto

A call to action for the worldwide cloud community.

Draft 1.0.9

Introduction

The buzz around cloud computing has reached a fever pitch. Some believe it is a disruptive trend representing the next stage in the evolution of the internet. Others believe it is hype, as it uses long established computing technologies. As with any new trend in the IT world, organizations must figure out the benefits and risks of cloud computing and the best way to use this technology. One thing is clear: The industry needs an objective, straightforward conversation about how this new computing paradigm will impact organizations, how it can be used with existing technologies, and the potential pitfalls of proprietary technologies that can lead to lock-in and limited choice.

This document is intended to initiate a conversation that will bring together the emerging cloud computing community (both cloud users and cloud providers) around a core set of principles. We believe that these core principles are rooted in the belief that cloud computing should be as open as all other IT technologies. This document does not intend to define a final taxonomy of cloud computing or to charter a new standards effort. Nor does it try to be an exhaustive thesis on cloud architecture and design.

Rather, this document speaks to CIOs, governments, IT users and business leaders who intend to use cloud computing and to establish a set of core principles for cloud providers. Cloud computing is still in its early stages, with much to learn and more experimentation to come. However, the time is right for the members of the emerging cloud computing community to come together around the notion of an open cloud.

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