Feeds

Kiwis scrap 'three strikes' P2P policy

Frenchie copyright law gets rewrite

SANS - Survey on application security programs

New Zealand has temporarily abandoned its plans to enact a French-style "three-strikes" internet policy that forces ISPs to disconnect customers repeatedly accused of illegally downloading copyrighted materials.

Kiwi's controversial section 92a of the Copyright Act was shown the door by Prime Minister John Key on Monday following public and corporate protests and a well-organized internet "blackout" campaign.

The laws, which would have come into force at the end of February, has been postponed for a month. It required ISPs to ban users repeatedly accused of copyright breaches, without requiring the allegations to be legally proven.

"Section 92a is not going to come into force as originally written," Key said. "We have now asked the minister of commerce to start work on a replacement section."

Commerce Minister Simon Power said in a statement yesterday that the legislation will be amended, but didn't provide a timetable for beginning to smooth over 92a's glaring omissions.

"While the government remains intent on tackling this problem, the legislation itself needs to be re-examined and reworked to address concerns held by stakeholders and the government," Power said.

Eh — we'll just close our eyes and pretend "stakeholders" means "citizens the government represents." Clearly, TelstraClear, one of the country's major ISPs, refusing to sign on to the proposed law made more of an impression than an angry electorate.

The government said it will re-introduce 92a following a review, but opponents are claiming a grass-roots victory.

"While the ultimate fate of section 92A of the New Zealand copyright act remains unclear, it's unlikely that anything resembling the proposed implementation of the mandate will see the light of day, given the public's response," wrote net watchdog group, Public Knowledge. "At the very least, it seems that stakeholders like ISPs, OSPs and consumer advocates will now be asked for their input, which will hopefully lead to a more balanced and reasonable implementation."

Keys, meanwhile, has stated he refuses to let the internet to become a "Wild West," where copyright owners have no recourse against internet piracy. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer
Do the right thing, earn up to 10 years in clink
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.