Feeds

Terry Waite backs McKinnon

Beirut hostage joins 'pretty harmless' camp

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Former Beirut hostage Terry Waite has spoken out against attempts to extradite self-confessed Pentagon hacker Gary McKinnon to face a US trial.

Waite, who since his release in 1991 has become a human rights and police campaigner, argues that the US military should thank McKinnon for exposing security holes in its systems. McKinnon's recent diagnosis of Aspberger's syndrome ought to prompt a decision by US authorities to drop the prosecution against McKinnon.

McKinnon claims he was only looking for suppressed information about anti-gravity propulsion systems and other UFO technology he reckons is being held from the public when he broke into US military systems. He admits hacking but denies doing any damage, against US claims that he was the "biggest military hacker of all time".

Waite said McKinnon's behaviour was "hardly that of a serious spy" and described his motives as "pretty harmless" adding "The Pentagon ought to thank him for exposing the vulnerability of their systems," the Press Association reports.

The former Church of England envoy urged common sense in the handling of the case, while emphasising that he supports law enforcement efforts to "track down and stop illegal activity" on the web, the BBC adds.

A judicial review on whether the Home Secretary was right to allow extradition proceedings against Gary McKinnon to proceed despite his health problems has been scheduled for 9 and 10 June. The hearing has become McKinnon's best hope of avoiding a US trial after failed appeals that went all the way to the House of Lords last year, and a more recent decision by UK prosecutors not to put McKinnon on trial on this side of the Atlantic.

McKinnon's long-running campaign against extradition has gained celebrity support over recent months. Alongside Waite other eminent sorts who have come out in support of McKinnon include the UK Government's independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, Lord Carlile of Berriew, former Police frontman Sting and London Mayor Boris Johnson. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.