Feeds

US woman attacks missus with sperm-filled syringe

Home insemination attempt ends in court

Top three mobile application threats

A Massachusetts woman has appeared in court on a domestic assault and battery rap after allegedly attempting to impregnate her wife with a plastic syringe containing her brother's sperm.

Stephanie K Lighten, 26, of Pittsfield, was reportedly “all liquored up” when she made unwelcome advances towards her other half, 33-year-old Jennifer Lighten. Jennifer explained to officers that Stephanie "had been talking about trying to impregnate her for some time", and that she'd accordingly armed herself with a "turkey baster and her brother’s semen in a sealed container".

The turkey baster was actually a "large syringe with a catheter tip", Lez Get Real clarifies, but whatever the implement in question, Jennifer told her partner "she didn’t want to get pregnant".

Things at this point allegedly took a turn for the worse, as Stephanie "threw Jennifer on the couch, grabbed at her clothes and threatened to impregnate her".

Lez Get Real continues: "Jennifer broke free, ran into the bathroom and locked the door. When Stephanie broke the bathroom door down, she hurt her wrist in the process, and Jennifer escaped when Stephanie went to get an ice pack from the freezer.

"Jennifer attempted to get away in the couple’s SUV and as she tried to pull away, Stephanie jumped on the side of car and made Jennifer stop."

Cue cops and a cuffing for the "intoxicated" Stephanie. Police confiscated the syringe "plus a container of semen and some aluminum foil, which was originally was used to hold the semen". Officers apparently confirmed the sperm was donated by Stephanie's bruv, Nicholas Lighten.

Jennifer Lighten decided not to press a charge of assault with intent to rape, because "she did not believe Stephanie was going to sexually assault her with the syringe".

Stephanie denied the remaining domestic assault and battery charge in Central Berkshire District Court. Judge Rita S Koenigs advised her to “refrain from abuse”, before releasing her on personal recognisance.

Stephanie Lighten is scheduled to appear in in court on 29 April for a pre-trial hearing, while her MySpace page is now "set to private". ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Spanish village called 'Kill the Jews' mulls rebranding exercise
Not exactly attractive to the Israeli tourist demographic
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Sleuths find nosy NORKS drones on the Chinternet
UAVs likely to have been made in the Middle Kingdom
Och aye! It's the Loch Ness Monster – but only Apple fanbois can see it
Fondleslab-friendly beastie's wake spotted... OR WAS IT?
Dorian Nakamoto gets $23,000 payout over Bitcoin invention saga
Maintains he didn't create cryptocurrency, but will join community
Japanese boffin EYES up big bucks with strap-on digi-glasses
AgencyGlass saddles user with creepy OLED display
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
Happy 40th Playmobil: Reg looks back at small, rude world of our favourite tiny toys
Little men straddle LOHAN, attend tiny G20 Summit... ah, sweet memories...
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.