Feeds

Mozilla hangs fire on Firefox 3.5 till June

Schtop! This browser is not ready

A new approach to endpoint data protection

Mozilla has further delayed the release date for the next version of its Firefox web browser.

The next version of the open source browser was initially due in early 2009, but the addition of extra fixtures and additional testing rounds means that the middle of the year has become a more realistic target date.

Firefox 3.1 beta 3 was released last week, alongside the news that a fourth beta is planned - a development that will see the browser re-christened as Firefox 3.5. "The decision to rename Firefox 3.1 to Firefox 3.5 reflects the sheer volume of work that makes it feel more than a small update to Firefox 3.0," Mozilla said.

Firefox director Mike Beltzner explained in a blog posting: "The increase in version number is proposed due to the sheer volume of work which makes Shiretoko feel like much more than a small, incremental improvement over Firefox 3: TraceMonkey, <video> tag and player support, improvements to user controls over data privacy, significant improvements in the web layout and rendering platform, and much more."

A limited number of release candidates for Firefox 3.5 will be released before the final version of the software comes out, probably in around "two to three" months, Mozilla evangelist Chris Blizzard posted last Friday.

Firefox 3.5 is due to turbo-charge the performance of web-based JavaScript programs and is due to feature built-in audio and video rendering capabilities, bypassing the need to install plug-ins from the likes of Adobe and Macromedia. The browser is also due to feature a private surfer (aka porn browsing) mode.

Mozilla has decided to run with additional features in extending the development cycle for the next version of the browser, in the face of stronger competition. Arch-rival Microsoft is putting the finishing touches to Internet Explorer 8, while Apple has released a beta of Safari 4. Opera too is tinkering under the bonnet of its browser, in an attempt to boost JavaScript-handling speeds. JavaScript handling has become a key battleground in browser development since the release of Google Chrome. ®

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration

More from The Register

next story
PEAK LANDFILL: Why tablet gloom is good news for Windows users
Sinofsky's hybrid strategy looks dafter than ever
Leaked Windows Phone 8.1 Update specs tease details of Nokia's next mobes
New screen sizes, dual SIMs, voice over LTE, and more
Fiendishly complex password app extension ships for iOS 8
Just slip it in, won't hurt a bit, 1Password makers urge devs
Mozilla keeps its Beard, hopes anti-gay marriage troubles are now over
Plenty on new CEO's todo list – starting with Firefox's slipping grasp
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
Cloudy CoreOS Linux distro declares itself production-ready
Lightweight, container-happy Linux gets first Stable release
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?