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MS security chief becomes DHS cybersecurity boss

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A senior Microsoft exec has been placed in charge of protecting the US's computer systems from hacking attacks

Philip Reitinge, chief trustworthy infrastructure strategist at Microsoft, has been appointed to the lead role in protecting the US government's computing network from from cyberattack. He was tapped by US Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano. The role is formally described as deputy undersecretary for the DHS's National Protection and Programs Directorate.

Reitinger previously served as the executive director of the Defense Department's Cyber Crime Center, which supplies computer forensics and investigation services to the US military. He's also worked in the Department of Justice, as deputy chief of the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property division

The appointment follows a week after Rod Beckstrom, director of the DHS National Cybersecurity Center, quit citing his opposition at what he described as the National Security Agency's increased role in cybersecurity. Reitinge will assume charge of running the centre, according to reports. ®

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