Feeds

Aussie firms makes Surface-readable business cards

MS tech serves up employee pics, Tweets, blog posts

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Ensuring people actually look at your business card, instead of throwing it into a drawer, is tough. But one firm hopes its innovative use of Microsoft’s Surface will make its business cards too tempting to bin.

Can't see the video? Download Flash Player from Adobe.com

Amnesia Razorfish, an Australian design firm, has printed Surface-readable tags on every business card.

When one of cards is placed onto the interactive coffee table, the gadget accesses the firm’s employee directory application and brings up more information about the business card’s owner, such as recent blog posts, Tweets and a Flickr feed.

The obvious disadvantage is that the firm’s employees will have to hand over a Surface to every person they exchange business cards with. But the idea’s cool, though.

Amnesia Razorfish apparently has many more planned uses for the application, which could extend to games and file sharing.

So, if you’re itching to know more about the firm’s future plans, be sure to take one of its employees out for lunch – and don’t forget to swap business cards. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Whitepapers

Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.