Feeds

EC calls for tech help on carbon targets

Making micro-generation work

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

The European Commission is calling on the technology and communications industry to not only sort out its own energy use and carbon emissions but also help the rest of industry make cuts too.

Greater use of technology will help the European Union achieve its targets for cutting carbon emissions by 20 per cent by 2020 and getting 20 per cent of European energy from renewable sources, we are told.

Information Commissioner Viviane Reding said: "ICT have an enormous untapped potential for saving energy right across the economy. I personally would recommend to the ICT sector to show the way for the rest of the economy by reducing its own carbon footprint already by 2015 by 20 per cent."

The Commission calls on the IT industry to set itself concrete targets. It also wants "working partnerships" between IT firms and building, construction and transport firms. Several tech companies have made voluntary pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions, although only Sun Microsystems hopes to meet the 20 per cent target by 2015.

The Commission wants member states to set minimal functional specifications for smart meters for use in homes. Smart metering can cut energy consumption by up to ten per cent.

Technology systems can cut energy use in buildings by 17 per cent and slash transport logistics carbon emissions by 27 per cent, the Commission believes.

More radically the Commission seems to be suggesting that the IT industry has a role to play in increasing the use of micro-generation of electricity from renewable resources.

"ICT tools can monitor a range of variables and ensure that both individuals and the network as a whole gain maximum efficiency from the energy generation capacity available." the Commission statement said.

The EC also announced a public consultation "to establish a common base for commitments to and claims of improved energy efficiency".

The ICT industry itself contributes two per cent to Europe's total carbon emissions - 1.75 per cent from use of the systems and 0.25 from their production. The Commission believes it has an important role in cutting the remaining 98 per cent. ®

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.