Feeds

BT rebuts database security breach claims

The very idea

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

BT has dismissed the significance of supposed vulnerabilities on its systems detailed by infamous hacker Unu on Tuesday.

The Romanian hacker posted screenshots illustrating what he claimed highlighted SQL injections in a posting at Hackersploit.org.

"A faulty parameter, improperly sanitized opens the vault to the pretious (sic) databases. One can gain access to such ordinary things as personal data, login data, and the like," Unu writes. A subsequent post explains that the issue involved blind SQL Injection vulnerabilities involving the site www.comparebroadband.bt.com.

But an investigation by BT concluded that the flaws (such as they are) involved only test systems.

A statement by the telecoms giant explains that its production systems and customer data remain safe.

BT has carried out a thorough investigation of this alleged breach. We have found that access was gained to a test database and therefore no customer details were revealed at any time.

When sites are under test they do not contain live data and are often not included within our secure network until they become operational. BT has developed rigorous, world-leading protection against unauthorised computer access in order to protect customer details and commercial interests. Where a suspected intrusion has occurred BT will act swiftly to ensure our customer data is not at risk.

Our operational systems have not been affected in any way by this attempt to break through our security.

Romanian hacker Unu came to prominence a month ago when he poked the websites of security vendors, such as Kaspersky Lab and BitDefender, discovering some problems in the process. More recently he's moved onto scouring the websites of large UK businesses, such as those run by Camelot and the Daily Telegraph and now BT, scouring for database flaws. In all of the three latest cases the firms involved have said that Unu's postings suggest a more severe problem than was actually the case.

Unu's results are genuine but his analysis fails to explain that partner or test sites, rather than the main sites of the Daily Telegraph and BT, for example, have flaws. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
NASTY SSL 3.0 vuln to be revealed soon – sources (Update: It's POODLE)
So nasty no one's even whispering until patch is out
Russian hackers exploit 'Sandworm' bug 'to spy on NATO, EU PCs'
Fix imminent from Microsoft for Vista, Server 2008, other stuff
US government fines Intel's Wind River over crypto exports
New emphasis on encryption as a weapon?
To Russia With Love: Snowden's pole-dancer girlfriend is living with him in Moscow
While the NSA is tapping your PC, he's tapping ... nevermind
Forget passwords, let's use SELFIES, says Obama's cyber tsar
Michael Daniel wants to kill passwords dead
Slap for SnapChat web app in SNAP mishap: '200,000' snaps sapped
This is what happens if you hand your username and password to a 3rd-party
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.