Feeds

Seagate revs up SATA speed

Keep up at the back

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Seagate and AMD have demonstrated a 6Gbit/s link between SATA disks and a server, double the speed of the current SATA 2 spec and the same as the fastest SAS speed.

The justification for the faster speed is to try and keep up with the accelerating growth in capacity - and cache capacity - of SATA disks, now at the 2TB level and destined to double and even triple in the foreseeable future. PC and server processors are also gaining more power through multi-CPU and multi-core technology. Also, SATA-interface solid state drives, such as Intel's X25-M SSD, can use the speed hike to get more I/O to/from the drive.

SATA was first launched in 2002 with a 1.5Gbit/s speed - about 150MB/sec - as a replacement for then current parallel ATA (PATA) interconnect standard between storage devices and servers. Serialising the interconnect provided faster speeds, longer cables (up to 1m) and scope for speed increases in the future.

An external SATA (eSATA) interconnect was introduced in 2004. SATA 2 doubled the speed to to 3Gbit/s - about 300MB/sec - in 2005 and started being required by storage devices, according to Seagate, in 2007.

Each SATA standard is backwards-compatible with the previous one.

In August 2008 the Serial ATA International Organisation (SATA-IO) ratified a 6GBit/s physical layer - delivering about 600MB/sec. AMD and Seagate have now teamed up to demo their prototype technology at either end of a SATA cable.

The idea is to introduce the new faster SATA one to two years before it is actually needed so that products can be developed and the technology bedded down in time for use. Seagate recommends that the interface data rate keeps ahead of the media data rate and so does not throttle back the device. The company reckons that SATA 3 won't be really needed until 2011.

By that time we may be hearing about the next SAS speed jump to 12Gbit/s and SATA 4 may also be just visible on the horizon, a couple of years behind.

Seagate says the general SATA 3 specification "has been enhanced with improved power management (and) advanced data steaming". The new standard may formally be known as SATA Revision 3.0, but will probably just get shortened to SATA 3. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.