Feeds

Government rejects call to limit insolvency firms' fees

Don't soak the liquidators

Security for virtualized datacentres

Minister for Employment Regulations Pat McFadden yesterday rejected calls to set controls on how much administrators can charge when a company goes into liquidation.

MP Gordon Banks called for the minister to set maximum limits and reduce fees charged by administrators and receivers handling company collapses. Fees are worked out according to time spent on the administration or as a percentage of assets realised by the process.

But McFadden rejected the call. He told the House that fees are agreed by the liquidation or creditors' committee or the creditors themselves if there is no such committee. That amount can then be reviewed by the court - because it is reviewed by the court, government ministers have no power to interfere.

McFadden said therefore he had no plans to limit or reduce fees charged.

While the point might seem rather arcane, with insolvenies likely to increase as the recession grinds on, creditors, particularly smaller suppliers, are likely to be aghast as they see the remaining assets of bust companies eaten up practitioners' fees

The question in Hansard is here. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.