Feeds

Firefox 3.1 morphs into Firefox 3.5

Mozilla claims version switcheroo won't hurt ship date

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Mozilla has renamed the oft-delayed Firefox 3.1 to Firefox 3.5 and said a fourth beta of the browser is slated for a 14 April release.

A possible name change has been batted around inside Mozilla Towers for several weeks, but the outfit finally confirmed the decision yesterday.

“As recently proposed, the version number of the Shiretoko project will be changed to Firefox 3.5 before the upcoming fourth beta release,” said Firefox director Mike Beltzner on the corporation's developer blog.

The number of new features that have been packed into the upcoming version of Internet Explorer’s closest rival meant it was necessary to reflect those changes in the name, said Mozilla’s engineering veep Mike Shaver last week.

"The increase in scope represented by TraceMonkey and Private Browsing, plus the sheer volume of work that's gone into everything from video and layout to places and the plugin service make it a larger increment than we believe is reasonable to label 3.1," he said.

Mozilla posted a proposed timeline for its developers to move various systems from Firefox 3.1 to Firefox 3.5 on the corporation’s wiki yesterday.

It details the planned changes to the release, which has already been hit by several delays due to show-stopping bugs.

In January Mozilla was unable to confirm when it would release the third beta of Firefox 3.1 after 15 nasty bugs were discovered in TraceMonkey, which is the firm’s new JavaScript Engine. Beta 3 is expected to land this Thursday and will be the final Firefox release to carry the 3.1 tag.

“It’s important to note that 3.5 represents a better labeling of our current scope, and not an indication that we intend to significantly increase this release’s scope any further,” said Shaver.

But the version switcheroo could ruffle feathers among the wider developer community, where some have grumbled about the number of delays the corporation has already hit with its upcoming browser release.

Last summer it was a slightly different story when Mozilla's platform evangelist Mark Finkle insisted on his blog that the transition to Firefox 3.1 wouldn’t be “a major pain-in-the-ass”, and pledged developers wouldn't be hit by “surprises along the way”. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
HTML5 vs native: Harry Coder and the mudblood mobile app princes
Developers just want their ideas to generate money
prev story

Whitepapers

Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.