Feeds

Fanboi co. punts half-price Mac mini memory

More putty knife fun

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Mac-centric parts supplier Other World Computing (OWC) has begun offering memory upgrades for Apple's new Mac mini at less than half of Apple's build-to-order price.

Apple's memory-upgrade prices border on the extortionate. Apple charges $150 for the two 2GB 1066MHz DDR3 SDRAMs needed to bump the Mac mini up to 4GB. OWC charges $64.99 (£46).

Other World Computing 2GB SO-DIMMs

Never pay Apple prices for RAM

All you need is a putty knife and a Phillips screwdriver to break into your new Mac mini and cut your RAM costs in half.

And if you're interested in upgrading your Mac mini's existing hard drive to a 500GB model, removing its optical drive, replacing it with a second 500GB drive, and RAIDing the two drives up, iFixit can show you how, and OWC can help you out with a pair of 500GB 2.5-inch hard drives for between $109.99 (Hitachi) and $119.99 (Seagate and Samsung).

Or you could just buy iFixit's full upgrade kit, complete with drive, cables, and tools, for the low, low price of $249.99.

And as you might guess, that's an upgrade not on Apple's build-to-order list. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.