Feeds

Apple's Snow Leopard set for June 8?

So say tea leaves, Amazon

Security for virtualized datacentres

The next version of Apple Mac OS X operating system, Snow Leopard, will be released on June 8 - if one Apple-watcher's prediction is correct.

The Baltimore Sun's David Zeiler, writing in his "Apple a Day" blog, came to this conclusion by recounting recent history and examining the events schedule of San Francisco's Moscone Center, the home of Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) since 2003, when it moved from its previous venue, Silicon Valley's San José Convention Center.

WWDC has traditionally vied with January's Macworld Expo as the stage for major Apple announcements. At his keynote for WWDC 2008, for example, Steve Jobs announced Snow Leopard, aka Mac OS X 10.6, which he said would be ready in "about a year."

Apple has not yet announced the dates of this year's WWDC, but last year, the five-day event was held June 9-13. In 2007, it was June 11-15, and in 2005, it was June 6-10. WWDC 2006 was an outlier, taking place August 7-11 - likely because Apple was waiting for Intel to provide the Woodcrest-class Xeon processors used in the Mac Pro that it announced at that year's keynote.

To make his Snow Leopard prediction, Zeiler takes one leap of faith: that Apple will choose to showcase their new operating system during the media orgy that accompanies any Apple keynote, whether performed by Steve Jobs or not.

Zeiler then checked Moscone West's schedule - the annex where WWDC is held - and there he found a listing for a seven-day "Corporate Meeting" from June 6-12. Considering that June 6 is a Saturday, and giving Apple two days to set up - including hanging their usual giant banners - the time-honored Monday-morning keynote taking place on June 8 seems a realistic possibility.

Moscone Convention Center: May/June 2009 schedule

Usual WWDC location? Check. Usual WWDC month? Check. Usual WWDC length? Check.

And here's where Zeiler's sleuthing gets clever. He then checked Amazon's book listings to find out when Snow Leopard books are scheduled for release. Bingo. The earliest ones are planned for mid-June - right after WWDC and right in time for a June 8 Snow Leopard release.

We believe Zeiler is onto something.

But we won't go as far as Philip Elmer-DeWitt of Fortune, who predicts that the man announcing the release of Snow Leopard on June 8 will be none other than His Steveness Himself.

It's not that we don't think Elmer-DeWitt presents a good argument. It's just that we're a bit weary of the ongoing Jobswatch.

Let the poor sick guy alone. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share
Not four. Point four. Count yer booty again, Microsoft
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
In a spin: Samsung accuses LG exec of washing machine SABOTAGE
Rival electronic giant tries to iron out allegations
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.