Feeds

Microsoft courts enterprises with Windows 7

Take a look. We dare you

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Microsoft has shifted focus from consumers and has begun targeting major enterprises mostly running Windows XP by telling them to prepare for Windows 7.

The company's Windows team has advised enterprises to start testing and planning for Windows 7 now and to send Microsoft their feedback.

"If you haven't been considering Windows 7, we think there are compelling reasons for you to take another look," Windows product management team member Gavriella Schuster has blogged.

"We're convinced Windows 7 has [sic] an exciting and powerful offering for our business customers, but we want to hear from you," Schuster wrote.

Schuster used the blog to draw attention to planned Windows 7 features that should be of interest to customers.

These include changes in PC management, mobile, and security. Schuster called out scripting and automation capabilities in Windows PowerShell 2.0 she said would help trouble shoot and manage PCs, features such as BranchCache, Direct Access and search for mobile and remote working, and the inclusion of BitLocker to secure mobile machines and AppLocker to specify access rights through group policy.

Schuster framed the features using the usual set of marketing props of businesses need to reduce their costs and get improved return on investment, stunning insights patiently distilled from lengthy research among more than 4,000 of the company's customers.

The attempt to wake enterprise users to Windows 7 is curious given Microsoft has - officially at least - maintained its successor to Windows Vista is not in anyway shape or form finished and won't be ready for delivery any time this year.

Still, Microsoft faces an uphill task in shaking of enterprise inertia. Just over two years since Microsoft launched Windows Vista, less than 10 per cent of PCs in the enterprise are running the operating system. The majority are comfortable on the company's eight-year-old Windows XP.

Separately, Microsoft's chief executive Steve Ballmer told Most Valuable Professionals (MVPs) attending their company's conference in Seattle, Washington that if they didn't move off Windows XP "they'd feel the wrath," according to attendees Twittering about the event. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
HTML5 vs native: Harry Coder and the mudblood mobile app princes
Developers just want their ideas to generate money
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
The total economic impact of Druva inSync
Examining the ROI enterprises may realize by implementing inSync, as they look to improve backup and recovery of endpoint data in a cost-effective manner.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Business security measures using SSL
Examines the major types of threats to information security that businesses face today and the techniques for mitigating those threats.