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Sony exec hints at third PSP Grand Theft Auto outing

Sony miffed by game's shift to the DS?

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Grand Theft Auto: Chinatown Wars will soon be released on Nintendo’s DS handheld console. But Sony isn’t prepared to let the franchise move to a rival handheld without a fight, and has hinted that another GTA for the PlayStation Portable (PSP) may be in the pipeline.

John Koller, Head of PSP Marketing in North America, told MTV that Sony’s having “continued conversations with Rockstar” and that GTA isn’t something that’s left the PlayStation family.

“We certainly have a tremendous relationship with [Rockstar] and always have,” he said.

Two GTA titles have already been launched on the PSP: Vice City Stories and Liberty City Stories.

However, the report added that Koller said he doesn’t see Chinatown Wars as a square match for the traditional DS fanbase. The game “raises some eyebrows in a lot of areas”, he said.

Grand Theft Auto: Chinatown Wars will be available on the Nintendo DS in the UK from 20 March, priced at around £18 ($25/€20). ®

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