Feeds

Environmentalists greenmail Google, Dell

Greenpeace presses suits to lobby pols, launch products

High performance access to file storage

Cebit 09 Greenpeace has called out the tech industry on its environmental claims, challenging the likes of Google and Dell to start applying pressure on governments to adopt meaningful emissions reduction targets ahead of a crucial meeting on a replacement for the Kyoto protocol.

The environmental pressure group has written to the biggest tech firms to simultaneously start delivering on their claims that technology can offset climate change and put pressure on their respective governments to push for tough targets at a meeting in Copenhagen in December.

Greenpeace climate campaigner Melanie Francis said "We see this as the year. If a strong deal is not signed in Copenhagen, it's really serious."

"[Tech firms] have been very vocal in saying they're only responsible for 2 per cent of emissions, and have solutions for the other 98 percent," said Francis. "We're asking them lobby their governments on this issue."

At the same time, said Francis, companies should cut their own emissions and actually deliver products and methodologies that can mitigate climate change and "Take advantage of the business opportunity they've been presented with."

"There's been lots of claims but we haven't seen any reliable figures,” said Francis. "We need them to back it up."

Tom Dowdell, the organisation's greener electronics campaign coordinator, said the letters to the CEOs had gone out a couple of weeks ago, and it had initial responses from a couple of firms, including Nokia, Microsoft, Fujitsu, and Sharp. Greenpeace would give them a month and then start compiling an initial report, before engaging in "continuous assessment" on the named firms throughout the year.

The group already had relationships with a number of the firms, he said, and some had made commitments to reduce their own environmental footprint. But Greenpeace wanted to see them use their muscle to put pressure on their governments and "Show support for official cuts." The list has a clear bias towards US and Japanese firms, those countries being seen as somewhat more hostile to emissions cuts.

The tech industry seems an obvious target for the group as tech companies have a tendency to at least pay lipservice to environmental concerns. At the same time, Greenpeace concedes that it is unlikely to have much success getting utilities and traditional heavy industries such as steel production or car makers to support radical cuts in Copenhagen, even if they weren't currently falling back on the recession as a reason for not taking action right now.

However, Dowdall didn't see much evidence of a seachange at Cebit, a year after the show daubed itself in green paint - and about nine months after oil prices, and with them energy costs, started a long downwards slide which may have pushed energy costs down the agenda for at least some CIOs. He described the show's Green village as more of a hamlet and noted that the tech industry's stock response to environmental concerns was energy efficiency in data centres, without giving too much thought to other ways it impacts the environment.

As well as Google and Dell, Greenpeace is targeting Cisco, Fujitsu, HP, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Nokia, Panasonic, Sharp, Sony, Sun Microsystems, Toshiba, Fujitsu, Nokia, Microsoft, and Sharp. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Video games make you NASTY AND VIOLENT
Especially if you are bad at them and keep losing
Elon Musk's LEAKY THRUSTER gas stalls Space Station supply run
Helium seeps from Falcon 9 first stage, delays new legs for NASA robonaut
Solar-powered aircraft unveiled for round-the-world flight
It's going to be a slow and sleepy flight for the pilots
Russian deputy PM: 'We are coming to the Moon FOREVER'
Plans to annex Earth's satellite with permanent base by 2030
LOHAN's Punch and Judy show relaunches Thursday
Weather looking good for second pop at test flights
Saturn spotted spawning new FEMTO-MOON
Icy 'Peggy' looks to be leaving the outer rings
Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years
Alloy, Alloy: Boffins in speed-classification breakthrough
India's GPS alternative launches second satellite
Closed satnav system due to have all seven birds aloft by 2016
Curiosity finds not-very-Australian-shaped rock on Mars
File under 'messianic pastries' and move on, people
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.