Feeds

Google CFO nabs $1.2m bonus for five months' work

This ain't Wall Street

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

The Chocolate Factory's new chief financial officer has received a million-dollar bonus after just five months on the job.

With a Tuesday SEC filing, Google said that in 2008, it splashed $6.3 million in bonus money on five of the top execs working under co-founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page and chief executive Eric Schmidt. The company's Executive Bonus Plan typically bypasses the big three.

Patrick Pichette, who assumed the CFO post on August 1, took home $1.244 million. And the man he replaced, George Reyes, landed an extra $675,000 five months after retiring.

The biggest winner was senior vice president Jonathan Rosenberg, who nabbed a $1.638 million bonus in 2008. Rosenberg is the man once who told the world Google would gradually tweak its search ad platform until it showed only one ad per page - only to be contradicted tout de suite by Sergey Brin.

But it would seem that Rosenberg's spin is just want the company wants. As he continues to paint rose-colored pictures of the Google ad platform during the company's earnings calls, Brin has all but disappeared from the quarterly briefings.

With Google allowing significantly more ads onto its search pages in recent months, the company's search monopoly continues to pull in the dough - even as the worldwide economy continues its downward spiral. In the fourth quarter of 2008, the Chocolate Factory pumped revenues up by 18 per cent over the previous year.

Thanks to this Meltdown proofiness, big bonuses also landed in the hands of senior vice president of engineering Robert Eustace and senior vice president of global sales and business development Omid Kordestani. Both took home $1.376 million.

Meanwhile, the company's share price is hovering just above $320, down from a high of $747.24 on November 7, 2007. And famously, the stock doesn't pay a dividend. But all you shareholders can rest assured that Google is at least taking care of its own. The company has also instituted a $460 million stock option buyback program that will allow its employees to retrieve their options from the bottom of the ocean. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Lords take revenge on REVENGE PORN publishers
Jilted Johns and Jennies with busy fingers face two years inside
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.